Nobel Prize 2016 — Seminar & Dinner with Michael Kosterlitz

Yesterday, APCTP organized a special lecture and dinner with professor Michael Kosterlitz and his wife Berit Kosterlitz.

Michael’s shown the contributions that led him to the Nobel prize in 2016. He also told us how good he was in climbing, and that he chose some of his first postdoc positions based on the mountains surrounding the cities.

His wife, Berit Kosterlitz, is very entertaining, she told us all sort of funny stories, some details on the Nobel prize backstage, and how in the 1960s she was invited by her friends to go to a concert of a new band in Cambridge, but Berit decided not to go because she thought that a band with a name of insects shouldn’t be good enough.

Anyway, it was a memorable dinner!

 

Strings, Computers and Landscape. . .

There is an interesting wave of papers on possible applications of deep learning and neural networks on the string theory landscape.

Evidently it’s something interesting to work with, mainly if you’re a student looking for a “manageable big problem” to tackle and has interest on computational physics. . . keep an eye on this stuff.

Long words

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis 
Oxford English Dictionary: it is “an artificial long word said to mean a lung disease caused by inhaling very fine ash and sand dust.”
👏👏
In Portuguese, (wikipedia says that, and I believe) the longest word is
Pneumoultramicroscopicossilicovulcanoconioticozinhos
presumably, it’s the Portuguese version of pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis. . .  The longest word that I know how to speak is
Anticonstitucionalissimamente